There are a lot of bugs that are just plain annoying. For example, I can't stand mosquitos, I don't know if it's because my blood tastes so good or If I give off a special scent but they love biting me anytime I'm outside.

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Some people can't stand bees but at least they give us honey for dealing with them. They are very important pollinators and producers of honey and medicinal products. The movement of pollen between plants is necessary for plants to fertilize and reproduce. Both farmed and wild bees control the growth and quality of vegetation when they thrive, and so do crops according to Medical News Today.

What Are An Invasive Species?

Some bugs are more than just annoying they are invasive to a certain area and cause great harm.  An invasive species is an introduced, nonnative organism (disease, parasite, plant, or animal) that begins to spread or expand its range from the site of its original introduction and that has the potential to cause harm to the environment, the economy, or to human health. A well-known example includes the unintentional introduction of the West Nile virus.

If You See Any Of These 7 Bugs In Michigan, Kill Them Immediately

the USDA  has  "Pest Tracker" on their website, where you click the name of your state to see pictures of the different insects and weeds, along with descriptions of the type of plant life they target and the damage they can do if they're not dealt with.

Asian Gypsy Moths / AGM

Credit: Canva
Credit: Canva
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AGMs are similar to the European gypsy moth found in the northeastern United States but have a much broader host range. Each female moth can lay hundreds of eggs that, in turn, yield hundreds of voracious caterpillars that may feed on more than 500 tree and shrub species. Large AGM infestations can completely defoliate trees. This defoliation can severely weaken trees and shrubs, making them more susceptible to disease. Repeated defoliation can lead to the death of large sections of forests, orchards, and landscaping. AGM females are also active fliers. Their ability to fly long distances makes it probable that AGMs could quickly spread throughout the United States.

Asian Longhorned Bettle / ALB

Credit: Canva
Credit: Canva
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The Asian Longhorned Bettle is a threat to America's hardwood trees. With no current cure, early identification and eradication are critical to its control. It currently infests areas in Massachusetts, New York and Ohio. It threatens recreation and forest resources valued at billions of dollars. The ALB has the potential to cause more damage than Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight and gypsy moths combined, destroying millions of acres of America's treasured hardwoods, including national forests and backyard trees.

Emerald Ash Borer / EAB

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Credit: Canva
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The Emerald Ash Borer is responsible for the destruction of tens of millions of ash trees in 30 states. Native to Asia, it likely arrived in the United States hidden in wood packing materials. The first U.S. identification of Emerald Ash Borer was in southeastern Michigan in 2002. There are a variety of treatment options that can serve as a control measure for the EAB, but they are not a cure. Because pesticide regulations differ from State to State, homeowners should contact their State department of agriculture or local extension office for guidance

European Cherry Fruit Fly

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Credit: Canva
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The European Cherry Fruit Fly is the most serious pest of cherries. Damage associated with this pest is caused by larval feeding in the fruit pulp, which can result in losses of up to 100% if left uncontrolled. This pest may be introduced to new areas through the transport of infested fresh cherries, soil, or fruit from host plants grown in areas where this pest is found. In 2016, Canada confirmed this pest on wild honeysuckle at several sites in Ontario. In 2017, the APHIS found European cherry fruit fly on traps hung in wild honeysuckle plants and sweet cherry trees along the Niagara River in New York. This was the first U.S. detection of European cherry fruit fly.

European Grapevine Moth / EGVM

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Credit: Canva
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The European Grapevine Moth is a significant agricultural pest throughout much of the world. It was first detected in the U.S. in California in September 2009 and fully eradicated in August 2016. The European Grapevine Moth is such a big threat because it can feed on the flower or fruit of host plants, most often grapes. If the moth attacks mature grape clusters, the berries can become further damaged through a potentially deadly infection of a fungus called botrytis, also known as bunch rot.

Khapra Bettle

Credit: USDA.gov
Credit: USDA.gov
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The Khapra Bettle is one of the world’s most destructive pests of stored grain products and seeds. Its feeding damage often spoils 30 percent of the product; up to 70 percent damage has been reported. Previous U.S. detections of this tiny beetle have required massive, long-term and costly control and eradication efforts. Established infestations are difficult to control because the beetle can survive without food for long periods, requires little moisture, hides in tiny cracks and crevices, and is relatively resistant to many insecticides and fumigants.

Spotted Lanternfly

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Credit: Canva
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The USDA says the Spotted Lanternfly is native to China and was first detected in Pennsylvania in September 2014. Spotted lanternfly feeds on a wide range of fruit, ornamental and woody trees, with tree-of-heaven being one of the preferred hosts. Spotted lanternflies are invasive and can be spread long distances by people who move infested material or items containing egg masses. If allowed to spread in the United States, this pest could seriously impact the country’s grape, orchard, and logging industries.

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