Take a look at these photos showing a unique and seldom seen perspective of the historic St. Joseph County Courthouse located in Centreville, Michigan.

The photos were taken by William Dolak using a drone.

Courtesy of William Dolak
Courtesy of William Dolak
Courtesy of William Dolak
Courtesy of William Dolak

Each image shows the picturesque building and the surrounding community in way that almost appears to be a miniature replica of community from days gone by.

The St. Joseph County Courthouse is located at 125 West Main Street in Centreville, Michigan. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993.

Centreville was first established as the county seat of St. Joseph County in 1831. The first county offices were located in a leased house. In 1841, Thomas W. Langley, donated land to the county on which to construct a courthouse and a jail, and the first county courthouse was completed the following year. In 1859, two additional office buildings were constructed. However, by the 1890s, the county buildings were becoming dilapidated, and by 1897, the need to repair or replace them had become critical. At first, the county board of supervisors adopted plans to renovate the existing courthouse, but county voters rejected the proposal. In 1899, the board adopted a plan to replace the courthouse, which was approved by voters alter that year.

A building committee was formed, and the committee selected architect Sidney J. Osgood of Grand Rapids to design this building. Ionia contractors David C Crookshank and William H. Somers were selected to construct the building. The cornerstone of the new courthouse was laid on September 7, 1899. The construction of the courthouse was completed by August 1900, at a total cost of $34,418.90. The building served to house the local courts until the 1970's, when a new two-story building was constructed south of the old courthouse. The building is still used by the county government.